Tag Archives: Ecuador

Longest career as a television news broadcaster

The longest career as a television news broadcaster was achieved by Alfonso Espinosa de los Monteros (Ecuador) who anchored television news without interruption from 1 March 1967 until today (last verified on 22 May 2014), a total of 47 years 83 days. Alfonso began his career as a television news anchor for Ecuavisa on 1 March, 1967, the same year of the foundation of the TV channel. Since then, he has been a part of the news program Televistazo and is currently the news vice-president Continue reading →

Most endangered animal

The Abingdon Island giant tortoise Geochelone elephantopus abingdoni is represented by a single living specimen, an aged male called `Lonesome George’, making it the world’s rarest reptile. With little hope of discovering another specimen, this particular subspecies of Galapagos giant tortoise is effectively extinct while still alive, unless cloning techniques can generate future replicas of George. Lonesome George also holds the record for the rarest reptile.

Most people buried in sand simultaneously

The most people buried in sand simultaneously is 684 and was achieved by Bora Bora (Ecuador) in Chipipe beach, Salinas, Ecuador, on 2 March 2013 Bora Bora is a brand of flip-flops and invited hundreds of families to the event and offered prizes for the most creative ‘burial’ – there were turtles, hearts, angels and lots of castles amongst other designs. Salinas is a popular weekend desitnation for people from the nearby city of Guayaquil.

Newest species of iguana

Although a number of new species of small, drab-coloured lizard are discovered and named each year, discoveries of large, conspicuously-coloured lizard species are much rarer. In 2009, however, it was announced that a new species of iguana, rose-pink (rosada) in colour and up to 1.75 m long, had been discovered living on a single volcanic mountain called Volcan Wolf on the island of Isabela in the Galapagos chain. Genetic tests confirmed that it was a very distinctive species, dating back over 5 million years, and Continue reading →

Rarest reptile

The Abingdon Island giant tortoise Geochelone elephantopus abingdoni is represented by a single living specimen, an aged male called `Lonesome George’, making it the world’s rarest reptile. With little hope of discovering another specimen, this particular subspecies of Galapagos giant tortoise is effectively extinct while still alive, unless cloning techniques can generate future replicas of George. Lonesome George is also the most endangered animal.